neguswemadeit:

mapsontheweb:

How Africa Would Look Like if its Borders Were Defined By Ethnicity and Language. By George Peter Murdock,1959
Read More

the things they don’t want you to know. but there’s equality though right.

neguswemadeit:

mapsontheweb:

How Africa Would Look Like if its Borders Were Defined By Ethnicity and Language. By George Peter Murdock,1959

Read More

the things they don’t want you to know. but there’s equality though right.

(via black-culture)

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PHOTO
Sep 30
11:48 am
13,694 notes

Fancy Old Buildings

medievalpoc:

warpedellipsis:

medievalpoc:

Maybe I’m searching wrong, but I can’t find anything about fancy old buildings built in Africa, like giant churches and state buildings plastered everywhere from Europe. I tried looking for specific countries but still nothing. Surely they’re not all destroyed?
Well, if you’re searching for “Africa”…then yeah, you’re probably searching wrong? I mean, I’ll act like stating the obvious isn’t necessary…? Because…?
image

This is so general, I don’t know quite how to answer you but I’ll do my best, I suppose.

You probably need to be much more specific. Basically you want the equivalent of European Medieval-y type castle buildings? They’re pretty much all over the place…
image

image

Fasilides Palace in Ethiopia:

image

For fancy Christian churches with painted interiors, try searching “Copt” or “Coptic” (these are Zagwe dynasty, I believe):

image

Here’s Saint George’s Church in Addis Abeba:

image

And Bete Giorgis in Lalibela, Ethiopia:

image

I mean, there’s no order to this, I’m just throwing stuff out there at random. If you want, there’s a Wikipedia page for World Heritage Sites in Africa here. There’s another Wikipedia page for Architecture of Africa here.

Yes! This is what I was looking for. A starting point. When I typed “fancy buildings” into google, it gave me lots of European and American stuff, the traditional sightseeing landmarks and a bunch of modern stuff. Ditto for “fancy old buildings”. Same with “fancy old European buildings.” It refused to give me anything besides the pyramids when I tried that with the African continent and specific African countries. I didn’t know anything more narrow to try beyond specifying countries. When I try it with the Americas, it refuses to give me anything that’s older than European settlers. Looking up specific destroyed cities was as far as I could get there. Asia and its countries have a lot of results, but I don’t know that history well enough to know what I’m looking at.

I’d have explained better in the ask, and included that obvious pyramids are obvious, but it didn’t have the space and I’d rather not create hassle by splitting it over several messages.

I’m glad to hear this was helpful. A search for “Architecture of _____” is going to give you better results than “old buildings” or “fancy old buildings”.

Also: as a lot of people in the notes for this post pointed out, the last image is an example of Rock-cut architecture. It’s carved out of the solid rock there, rather than being built. Like, literally excavated from the roof down.

The Great Mosque of Djenné is the largest structure to have been built of earthen bricks, and was a great medieval center of learning. The  maintenance of the mosque’s exterior is actually part of an annual festival; it looks more or less the same as it did in 1910:

image

image

There is so much to find out, and I’m glad to encourage people to do further research.


POST
Sep 24
2:00 pm
3,016 notes

POST
Sep 14
4:30 pm
116,443 notes
mapsontheweb:

How Africa Would Look Like if its Borders Were Defined By Ethnicity and Language. By George Peter Murdock,1959
Read More

mapsontheweb:

How Africa Would Look Like if its Borders Were Defined By Ethnicity and Language. By George Peter Murdock,1959

Read More

(via endlessrebel)

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PHOTO
Sep 10
12:25 am
13,694 notes

beautiesofafrique:

African Kingdom/Empire of the week: The Songhai/ Songhay Empire

(Images of pre-colonial to modern day Songhai people above)

The Songhai Empire was the largest and last of the three major pre-colonial empires to emerge in West Africa.  From its capital at Gao on the Niger River, Songhai expanded in all directions until it stretched from the Atlantic Ocean to what is now Northwest Nigeria and western Niger.  Gao, Songhai’s capital, which remains to this day a small Niger River trading center, was home to the famous Goa Mosque and the Tomb of Askia, the most important of the Songhai emperors. The cities of Timbuktu and Djenne were the other major cultural and commercial centers of the empire.

The Songhai people founded Gao around 800 A.D.  As the city and region grew in importance, the Malian Empire incorporated both as it expanded across the West African savanna. 

Though the Songhai people are said to have established themselves in the city of Gao about  800 A.D , they did not regard it as their capital until the beginning of the 11th century during the reign of the dia (king) Kossoi, a Songhai convert to Islām. Gao so prospered and expanded during the next 300 years that from 1325 to 1375 the rulers of Mali added it to their empire. In about 1335 the dia line of rulers gave way to the sunni, or shi, one of whom, Sulaiman-Mar, is said to have won back Gao’s independence. The century or so of vicissitudes that followed was ended by the accession in about 1464 of Sonni ʿAlī, also known as ʿAlī Ber (d. 1492). By repulsing a Mossi attack on Timbuktu, the second most important city of Songhai, and by defeating the Dogon and Fulani in the hills of Bandiagara, he had by 1468 rid the empire of any immediate danger. He later evicted the Tuareg from Timbuktu, which they had occupied since 1433, and, after a siege of seven years, took Jenne (Djenné) in 1473 and by 1476 had dominated the lakes region of the middle Niger to the west of Timbuktu. He repulsed a Mossi attack on Walata to the northwest in 1480 and subsequently discouraged raiding by all the inhabitants of the Niger valley’s southern periphery. The civil policy of Sonni ʿAlī was to conciliate the interests of his pagan pastoralist subjects with those of the Muslim city dwellers, on whose wealth and scholarship the Songhai empire depended. His son Sonni Baru (reigned 1493), who sided completely with the pastoralists, was deposed by the rebel Muḥammad ibn Abī Bakr Ture, also known as Muḥammad I Askia (reigned 1493–1528), who welded the central region of the western Sudan into a single empire. He too fought the Mossi of Yatenga, tackled Borgu, in what is now northwestern Nigeria (1505)—albeit with little success—and mounted successful campaigns against the Diara (1512), against the kingdom of Fouta-Toro in Senegal, and to the east against the Hausa states. In order to win control of the principal caravan markets to the north, he ordered his armies to found a colony in and around Agadez in Aïr. He was deposed by his eldest son, Musa, in 1528. Throughout the dynastic squabbles of successive reigns (Askia Musa, 1528–31; Bengan Korei, also known as Askia Muḥammad II, 1531–37; Askia Ismail, 1537–39; Askia Issihak I, 1539–49), the Muslims in the towns continued to act as middlemen in the profitable gold trade with the states of Akan in central Guinea. The peace and prosperity of Askia Dāwūd’s reign (1549–82) was followed by a raid initiated by Sultan Aḥmad al-Manṣūr of Morocco on the salt deposits of Taghaza. The situation, which continued to worsen under Muḥammad Bāni (1586–88), culminated disastrously for Songhai under Issihak II (1588–91) when Moroccan forces, using firearms, advanced into the Songhai empire to rout his forces, first at Tondibi and then at Timbuktu and Gao. Retaliatory guerrilla action of the pastoral Songhai failed to restore the empire, the economic and administrative centres of which remained in Moroccan hands.

At its peak, the Songhai city of Timbuktu became a thriving cultural and commercial center. Arab, Italian, and Jewish merchants all gathered for trade. A revival of Islamic scholarship also took place at the university in Timbuktu. However, Timbuktu was but one of a myriad of cities throughout the empire. By 1500, the Songhai Empire covered over 1.4 million square kilometers

Economic trade existed throughout the Empire, due to the standing army stationed in the provinces. Central to the regional economy were independent gold fields. The Julla (merchants) would form partnerships, and the state would protect these merchants and the port cities of the Niger. It was a very strong trading kingdom, known for its production of practical crafts as well as religious artifacts.

The Songhai economy was based on a clan system. The clan a person belonged to ultimately decided one’s occupation. The most common were metalworkers, fishermen, and carpenters. Lower caste participants consisted of mostly non-farm working immigrants, who at times were provided special privileges and held high positions in society. At the top were noblemen and direct descendants of the original Songhai people, followed by freemen and traders. At the bottom were war captives and European slaves obligated to labor, especially in farming. James Olson describes the labor system as resembling modern day unions, with the Empire possessing craft guilds that consisted of various mechanics and artisans

Upper classes in society converted to Islam while lower classes often continued to follow traditional religions. Sermons emphasized obedience to the king. Timbuktu was the educational capital. Sonni Ali established a system of government under the royal court, later to be expanded by Askia Muhammad, which appointed governors and mayors to preside over local tributary states, situated around the Niger valley. Local chiefs were still granted authority over their respective domains as long as they did not undermine Songhai policy

Tax was imposed onto peripheral chiefdoms and provinces to ensure the dominance of Songhai, and in return these provinces were given almost complete autonomy. Songhai rulers only intervened in the affairs of these neighboring states when a situation became volatile; usually an isolated incident. Each town was represented by government officials, holding positions and responsibilities similar to today’s central bureaucrats.

Under Askia Muhammad, the Empire saw increased centralization. He encouraged learning in Timbuktu by rewarding its professors with larger pensions as an incentive. He also established an order of precedence and protocol and was noted as a noble man who gave back generously to the poor. Under his policies, Muhammad brought much stability to Songhai and great attestations of this noted organization are still preserved in the works of Maghrebin writers such as Leo Africanus, among others

Sources/ Read more: 1| 2| 3

(If you want to know where I got all the images from ask)

image

King Askia Muhammad aka Askia the Great

image

King Sunni Ali Ber 


PHOTOSET
Aug 29
11:07 am
1,284 notes
jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ
This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall
it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ

This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall

it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

(via tumblrgym)

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PHOTO
Aug 21
11:10 am
116,223 notes

yagazieemezi:

Know Safa Idriss Nour (then & now)

Super model Waris Dirie Somali model insisted Safa Idriss Nour, the child who played her suffering FGM in biopic, had to be spared the same fate

When she was three years old, Safa Idriss Nour received something no girl in her slum in Djibouti had been given before – a signed contract from her parents stating they would never inflict genital mutilation on her.

In Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, an estimated 98% of girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM), a procedure that usually involves cutting off the clitoris and some of the labia, so this was a remarkable event. Equally remarkable is the story of how Nour came to get the contract and, indeed, of her battle to ensure that her parents stuck to the terms of the deal.

Nour starred in a film adaptation of Desert Flower, the international bestselling autobiography by Somali model and anti-FGM activist Waris Dirie. Published in 1997, her first book follows Dirie from her birth into a nomadic family in Somalia – from whom she fled, aged 13, after her father attempted to marry her to a 60-year-old man – to her becoming an international supermodel.

In 2007, Nour was asked to play the young Dirie as she undergoes FGM – on condition that her parents sign a contract agreeing never to perform the same ritualistic operation on her (keep reading)

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic


PHOTOSET
Aug 10
6:19 pm
8,188 notes
howtobeterrell:

atane:

CNN mixed up Nigeria and Niger. Not surprising if you watch western news regularly. They use Nigerian and Nigerien like it’s interchangeable. 

I’ll never forget when a reporter was on location and said “reporting from the capital, Niamey…” and the anchor in the studio started talking about what people in Lagos and the rest of Nigeria think of the latest developments in the capital, Niamey.

These are the people discussing Africa on the news.

Lol

howtobeterrell:

atane:

CNN mixed up Nigeria and Niger. Not surprising if you watch western news regularly. They use Nigerian and Nigerien like it’s interchangeable.

I’ll never forget when a reporter was on location and said “reporting from the capital, Niamey…” and the anchor in the studio started talking about what people in Lagos and the rest of Nigeria think of the latest developments in the capital, Niamey.

These are the people discussing Africa on the news.

Lol

(via endlessrebel)

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PHOTO
Aug 8
10:30 pm
1,179 notes
medievalpoc:

lyricsja:


EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa


Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.
Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.
Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.
A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:


These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.
By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.
 At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu. 
By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s. 


So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.
Also, as an additional consideration:


With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States. 


Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.
It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:

EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa

Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.

Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.

Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.

A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:

These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.

By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.

At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu.

By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s.

So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.

Also, as an additional consideration:

With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States.

Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.

It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

(via medievalpoc)


PHOTO
Aug 8
9:05 am
37,434 notes

nok-ind:

historydepicted:

Here’s a big project I worked on a while ago, depicting the ancient glory and modern destruction of the Nubian pyramids at Meroë. The two images are shot from the same perspective so you can flip between them. To learn more about the Nubian culture, their relationship with Ancient Egypt, and why and when the pyramids were obliterated, check out the fuller history at historydepicted.com !

The Italians and british took this place apart due to greed and arrogance this has happened all over the continent. Our collective histories and cultures have been appropriated raped then disregarded.

(via queen-pharaoh)


PHOTOSET
Aug 4
2:19 pm
586 notes

Peace Love & Afro Puffs...

Here you will find: thoughtful words. beautiful heads of kinky curly hair. things from the various corners of the geekdom universe. vintage images and clothing. cinema talk. and commentary on a variety of topics ... basically the all around randomness that is me. :)