jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ
This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall
it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ

This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall

it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

(via tumblrgym)

TAGS:


PHOTO
Aug 21
11:10 am
50,185 notes

yagazieemezi:

Know Safa Idriss Nour (then & now)

Super model Waris Dirie Somali model insisted Safa Idriss Nour, the child who played her suffering FGM in biopic, had to be spared the same fate

When she was three years old, Safa Idriss Nour received something no girl in her slum in Djibouti had been given before – a signed contract from her parents stating they would never inflict genital mutilation on her.

In Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, an estimated 98% of girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM), a procedure that usually involves cutting off the clitoris and some of the labia, so this was a remarkable event. Equally remarkable is the story of how Nour came to get the contract and, indeed, of her battle to ensure that her parents stuck to the terms of the deal.

Nour starred in a film adaptation of Desert Flower, the international bestselling autobiography by Somali model and anti-FGM activist Waris Dirie. Published in 1997, her first book follows Dirie from her birth into a nomadic family in Somalia – from whom she fled, aged 13, after her father attempted to marry her to a 60-year-old man – to her becoming an international supermodel.

In 2007, Nour was asked to play the young Dirie as she undergoes FGM – on condition that her parents sign a contract agreeing never to perform the same ritualistic operation on her (keep reading)

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic


PHOTOSET
Aug 10
6:19 pm
6,527 notes
howtobeterrell:

atane:

CNN mixed up Nigeria and Niger. Not surprising if you watch western news regularly. They use Nigerian and Nigerien like it’s interchangeable. 

I’ll never forget when a reporter was on location and said “reporting from the capital, Niamey…” and the anchor in the studio started talking about what people in Lagos and the rest of Nigeria think of the latest developments in the capital, Niamey.

These are the people discussing Africa on the news.

Lol

howtobeterrell:

atane:

CNN mixed up Nigeria and Niger. Not surprising if you watch western news regularly. They use Nigerian and Nigerien like it’s interchangeable.

I’ll never forget when a reporter was on location and said “reporting from the capital, Niamey…” and the anchor in the studio started talking about what people in Lagos and the rest of Nigeria think of the latest developments in the capital, Niamey.

These are the people discussing Africa on the news.

Lol

(via endlessrebel)

TAGS:


PHOTO
Aug 8
10:30 pm
540 notes
medievalpoc:

lyricsja:


EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa


Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.
Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.
Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.
A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:


These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.
By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.
 At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu. 
By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s. 


So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.
Also, as an additional consideration:


With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States. 


Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.
It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:

EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa

Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.

Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.

Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.

A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:

These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.

By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.

At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu.

By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s.

So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.

Also, as an additional consideration:

With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States.

Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.

It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

(via medievalpoc)


PHOTO
Aug 8
9:05 am
35,154 notes

nok-ind:

historydepicted:

Here’s a big project I worked on a while ago, depicting the ancient glory and modern destruction of the Nubian pyramids at Meroë. The two images are shot from the same perspective so you can flip between them. To learn more about the Nubian culture, their relationship with Ancient Egypt, and why and when the pyramids were obliterated, check out the fuller history at historydepicted.com !

The Italians and british took this place apart due to greed and arrogance this has happened all over the continent. Our collective histories and cultures have been appropriated raped then disregarded.

(via queen-pharaoh)


PHOTOSET
Aug 4
2:19 pm
504 notes

looneytoonz242:

melaninwaterbones:

fckyeahprettyafricans:

African twerking lol

Enjoy

EFFORTLESS #BowDown

unbothered!!! yasss gal!!!

(via kenyabenyagurl)

TAGS:


VIDEO
Jul 30
5:30 pm
2,289 notes

1shara:

thedarkaquarian:

privilegetoengtranslationservice:

logicd:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Congress is what happens when you put white people in charge.

And Africa is what happens when you put black people in charge.

Translation:

Clearly I don’t know that Africa had many great and thriving civilizations before Europeans came and fucked that up.

Tell me about the thriving civilizations, and how they fell. Just give me a few words to type into google. Just one. One word.

Like what Mali, Ghana, Songhai, Benin further south you had the Mwene Motapa, 

(via amuzed1)

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POST
Jul 17
8:08 pm
14,995 notes

thefemaletyrant:

refashionafrica:

TRAVEL & LIFESTYLE

Visual diary of Dakar Part 2

Refashion Africa strives to keep a fashionable eye on urban Africa

“Through my eyes” is a 3 part travel photo series from Dakar, Senegal.

Join REFASHION AFRICA .

Instagram |Pinterest |Facebook | Tumblr

 

I see the Calabash~

(And it looks like this person sat at the same spot I did because I have the same photo of outside the window (although mine was on a crappy phone camera). We also ate the same menu.)

TAGS:


PHOTOSET
Jul 9
9:56 am
212 notes

sword-site:

African Sword of the Early 20th Century Unknown Nationality

Steel and snakeskin

Overall - l:62.90 cm 

Read more: http://sword-site.com/thread/641/african-sword-century-unknown-nationality?page=1&scrollTo=1087#ixzz2vLEpST4n

Sword-Site: The World’s Largest Free Online Sword Museum

http://www.sword-site.com

(via thefemaletyrant)

TAGS:


PHOTOSET
Mar 31
7:00 pm
47 notes

ikaythegod:

Watch the exclusive full lecture here.

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)


PHOTOSET
Mar 4
10:12 pm
32,106 notes

Peace Love & Afro Puffs...

Here you will find: thoughtful words. beautiful heads of kinky curly hair. things from the various corners of the geekdom universe. vintage images and clothing. cinema talk. and commentary on a variety of topics ... basically the all around randomness that is me. :)