PHOTOSET
Apr 18
10:40 am
347 notes

artistically-jasmine:

khaleesibelius:

sapphicnymph:

valleypunx:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

paisle4n:

prsjon:

The Doll Test

This self hate thing is DEEP

this makes me mad 

This is a compilation of doll tests featuring children of many races.

This is so fucking important

if you ever have to ask why intersectionality is important, direct yourself back to this video

The experience had already been done 60 years prior, and the results were the same.

Absolutely nothing has changed.

Why am I not surprised ?

I feel like I’m going to throw up

(Source: lindsaychrist, via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

TAGS:


VIDEO
Apr 14
11:12 pm
74,512 notes
marxrecords asked:

hi! i think that an important point to consider when talking about race and latin american immigrants in the united states is the fact that the construct of race here in latin america is distinct from the concept of race in the united states.

kyssthis16:

blueklectic:

fyqueerlatinxs:

for instance, you mentioned white mexicans. while in latin america race depends more on skin color and less on ancestry, in anglo america it’s determined mainly by where someone is from and their ancestry. someone born in mexico will never be white in the US, regardless of how light their complexion is. even if they dont speak like a foreigner, they will only pass for white until it’s revealed that theyre from latin america. thoughts?

We definitely agree on the idea that race as a concept is different in Latin America than it is in the US. For one, inequality in Latin America is often talked about in terms of class (often ignoring the fact that those who are poorest are the darkest and most indigenous) while in the US inequality is talked about in terms of race (ignoring how class further oppresses black people and other POCs)

However, we will respectfully disagree on your last statement. You CAN be considered white EVEN when your Latin American heritage has been disclosed.

We will use Alexis Bledel as a prime example.

image

Alexis Bledel identifies as Latina. Her father is Argentinian and her mother was raised in Mexico City. She has done countless articles talking about her “Latin American background.” And she is ALWAYS featured during Latin@ Heritage Month in “[insert number] of [white] celebrities you didn’t know were Latin@” articles.

BUT she is NOT racialized in the same manner that say Jessica Alba is. In fact, in almost all her roles she plays a white woman, DESPITE being completely fluent in Spanish, DESPITE being open about her Latinidad. She is treated as the white person that she is.

Now we know now you’re probably saying her name helps her out. And it’s true. Carlos Irwin Estevez (although technically he’s not Latino, he’s Spanish) changed his name to Charlie Sheen to help him pass as the white man he is. But we have another example of white Latin@s being racialized as white in Frankie Muniz.

image

Another celebrity heavily featured in the ubiquitous Latin@ Heritage [inser number] white Latin@ celebrities we rather feature instead of brown/black celebrities fluff pieces, Frankie Muniz is Puerto Rican. Yet despite his obviously Latin@ last name, he also has not been racialized as non-white. Instead, he consistently plays non-Latin@ white roles.

And last but not least we have Christina Aguilera

image

She is proudly Latina, much like Alexis Bledel. She even has a VERY Latina sounding name. She’s recorded albums in Spanish. BUT even during her Dirrrty phase, she was not hypersexualized in the same manner that other WOC artists are. Instead, her expression of sexuality and its reception were more reminiscent of how Madonna’s overt sexuality was performed and received. In contrast, artists like Nicki Minaj and Rihanna (two black female artists of Caribbean descent) are criticized for their expressions of sexuality and often villainized and their respective crafts dismissed because of how they choose to express their bodies and sexuality.

so tl;dr, No. Sorry, we refuse to accept the lie that White Latin@s are always racialized as ‘other’ in the US upon realization of their Latin American heritage. This is patently not true. Yes, some light-skinned Latin@ have conditional white passing privilege. But to say that no matter how light and bright they get they will never pass as white, I’m sorry but the evidence shows otherwise.

White Latin@s are white. This will never cancel out their Latinidad. But Latinidad can also never cancel their white privilege, so long as white supremacy is rule of the land.

A lot of Latinos get on my nerves with this shit “in Latin America we’re all just Latino!! Nobody notices the difference” man bye with that bullshit.

ALL OF THIS!

ASK

ANSWER
Apr 5
5:43 pm
2,714 notes

racismschool:

Ethnicity vs Race from Diffen.com

Check out the site. It’s really amazing. Even giving an option to compare things to make them easier to understand. Very cool site!

image

(via blueklectic)

TAGS:


PHOTOSET
Mar 26
4:06 pm
3,339 notes
america-wakiewakie:

"She doesn’t look American": Coca Cola & Re-Branding White Supremacy | AmericaWakieWakie
From his lips came the numbing question, “What are you?” I am human, I thought keeping quiet. He pressed onward, “No, I mean what is in you?” as if my insides varied so remarkably from his. “Are you mixed?” My lips are full. Tan skin. Dark curled hair. Brown eyes. I am half Latino. Standing in silence I peeked around him. He was bigger than me, older. The body in front of me stooped, his head titled level to mine. Curiosity left his throat as condescending bass began drumming my ears. He repeated his question, louder — “What are you?”
Growing up in Mississippi’s rural countryside these questions became coldly mechanical. Little surprise then yesterday during Coca Cola’s now controversial exercise in multiculturalism, as a Muslim woman came on screen, did I hear the inbred cousin of “What are you” — aka, “She doesn’t look American.” Both, the question asked of me and the assumption made about this woman, at their core say something else more sinister than the words actually muttered.
With bravado they say: You are not White.  
Such reminders to black and brown people in America have been a constant thread throughout our history. Yet, yesterday’s Coca Cola advert, what amounted to black and brown faces singing ‘America the Beautiful’ in native tongue, and the uproar thereafter, offers a unique lens into understanding how embedded racism truly is within our culture, even if in gross irony. In essence, literally, before us is the depth and ubiquity of America’s white supremacy.
White Supremacy is American as Apple Pie
Let’s be clear: The only reason folks — white people — are being overtly racist in the wake of Coca Cola’s commercial is because the normalized, yet often unarticulated, conception of white supremacy is almost always white. This culture of whiteness derives from itself the racial identities of its participants, its history and mythology, how they operate in the world, and perhaps most of all, it is by this process of normalization that white supremacy finds itself purposefully the dominant cultural phenomenon in America, dictating too the identities of all Others in proximity to it.
Speaking in 1965 on the ubiquity of whiteness, before a packed Cambridge debate, James Baldwin unleashed the fullness of his lived experience:
 “In the case of the American Negro, from the moment you are born every stick and stone, every face, is white. Since you have not yet seen a mirror, you suppose you are, too. It comes as a great shock around the age of 5, 6, or 7 to discover that the flag to which you have pledged allegiance, along with everybody else, has not pledged allegiance to you. It comes as a great shock to see Gary Cooper killing off the Indians, and although you are rooting for Gary Cooper, that the Indians are you.”
Not much has changed. When Coca Cola aired its commercial, black and brown Americans quickly got thousands, if not millions, of reminders that as people of color, we, like Baldwin realized, are not Gary Cooper — that, therefore, we are not constitutive elements of American culture. Visiting Twitter after the game, the visibility of white supremacy repeated itself ad nauseum:




(Photo Credit: Public Shaming @ Tumblr)
The Irony: Racists Are Offended the Ad’s Racism Wasn’t Racist Enough  
Coca Cola’s commercials, like the one aired at the Super Bowl, are propagandized rhetoric, a mouthpiece peddling systemized oppression as liberation. The racist backlash from Coca Cola’s advertisement, therefore, stems from a branding OF white supremacy which deviates from the white-only narrative. 
Building from the picture Baldwin illustrated, sheets of white opacity blanket us daily whereby, for white Americans, any skirmish away from a white dominated narrative — in this case manifested through media — is an abrupt disjoint in reality. Such an inability, or unwillingness, to deviate from the world of white supremacy speaks to a sort of normalcy that has become, in its subserviating power over individuals’ minds, totalitarian. And like all totalitarianism, a system of constant propaganda is needed to keep people in lockstep.
This is called television.
In 2006 the study Out of The Picture: Minority & Female TV Station Ownership in the United States highlighted the racial disparity, and white supremacy, of American television by analyzing the current status and the effects of FCC policy and media consolidation. Findings were as follows:
Minorities comprise 33 percent of the entire U.S. population, but own a total of only 44 stations, or 3.26 percent of all stations.
Hispanics or Latinos comprise 14 percent of the entire U.S. population, but only own a total of 15 stations, or 1.11 percent of all stations.
Blacks or African Americans comprise 13 percent of the entire U.S. population but only own a total of 18 stations, or 1.3 percent of all stations.
Asians comprise 4 percent of the entire U.S. population but only own a total of 6 stations, or 0.44 percent of all stations.
Couple these disparities with the fact that black and brown people in mainstream television often are depicted either as an afterthought, or pandering to racist stereotypes of laziness, self-destructiveness, violence, criminality, and disposability, the paradigm of white conceptions of people of color becomes grossly perverted and hostile. Thus, from within this world looking outward — even in a commercial depicting people of color as the human beings we are —  it registers least of all to the white supremacist that the legal, economic, political, educational, religious, and cultural practices of all Americans might not be those of white Americans.
Economic Imperialism Re-Branded With Black & Brown Faces
"In Guatemala, Coca Cola is a name for murder." 
— Israel Marquez, General Secretary of STEGAC (1979)
Knowing the racial disparities within our culture’s television and the institutions thereof, isn’t Coca Cola just being a good corporate citizen by challenging the white supremacist’s narrative of who ought to or could be considered American? At face value this commercial does seem as if Coca Cola is ‘leading the charge’ toward a post-racial America, but as usual if we use common sense we know corporations are rarely if ever altruistic.
Coca Cola is using the same institutions of white supremacy it has always used to increase market share locally and globally by re-branding its product with black and brown faces, a brand of multiculturalism that to the American mind – especially the white American mind — erases the longstanding history of corporate sponsored repression throughout the world.    
Guatemala has been victim to such erasure. The world’s largest beverage supplier has been bottling in the Central American nation since 1939 through franchise contracts and affiliates, one of which was Embotelladora Guatemalteca S.A., or EGSA (owned by the Flemings, a North American family from Texas). Post the United States backed coup in 1954, Guatemalan unions had been crushed. Union representation plummeted from 27% of the working population to 2%. In this backdrop the Flemings hired John C. Trotter as company President, a feverishly anti-union anti-communist. In the years from 68’ to 87’, under Trotter’s watch EGSA unionists and their families would be marred with intimidation, constant attempts to impede workers’ collaborations, beatings, rape, kidnapping, and murder. 
A booklet titled Soft Drink, Hard Labour published in 1987 by the Latin America Bureau in London, England documents the 1979 casualties between April and July as “an avalanche of killings” where at least 32 EGSA associates are beaten, 4 are kidnapped and disappear, 31 are fired, 4 wounded by gunshot, a daughter of a union lawyer is raped and tortured, and 8 are murdered. In the case of Arnulfo Gomez Segura, his lips were slashed with a razor; his tongue cut from his mouth and placed in his shirt pocket.  
Per the usual corporate scapegoat, Coca Cola maintained that is had no responsibility for its affiliates’ actions. But as a campaign to boycott the Atlanta retailer wrote:
“By allowing EGSA to use your trade mark, to act as your representative in Guatemala and by deriving financial benefits from your agreement with this company, you have committed your company’s image and interest. If your license holder is seen to be directly responsible for murders and other acts of violence, threats and intimidation committed against the members of the union representing the employees of EGSA, continuing cooperation between your company and this license holder constitutes complicity.”
The multinational corporation has not learned its lesson either. KillerCoke.org reported:  
“International Rights Advocates, a non-profit human rights organization, and the Conrad and Scherer law firm filed a new civil lawsuit against The Coca-Cola Company. The case was first filed in the State Supreme Court in New York on February 25, 2010, and in April it was moved to the U.S. District Court of the Southern District of New York (Case # 10-CIV-03120).
The case involves a campaign of violence that includes rape, attempted murder and murder against two Guatemalan trade unionists and their families. The two trade unionists are Jose Armando Palacios, who was forced to flee to the U.S. in early 2006, and Jose Alberto Vicente Chavez, whose son and nephew were murdered and whose daughter was gang raped on March 1, 2008.”
An old euphemism tried and true says all there is to know of corporate motive — follow the money. In an interview with NPR, Jimmy Smith, Creative Director at TBWA/CHIAT/DAY, inadvertently — but impeccably — put it:
“[A]dvertisers… definitely… understand that more than just white America is buying their products. So they’re trying to reach all cultures and all races, whether it’s Latino, black, Asian or, you know, Native American. It doesn’t matter. They just see that as another opportunity to sell their product.”
With a shallow motive as unabridged profiteering upon the backs of black and brown laborers, Coca Cola is but an extension of America’s white supremacy and purveyor of its economic imperialism. The sort of exploitation in Guatemala has been documented elsewhere too, in China, Columbia, El Salvador, India, Kenya, Mexico, Pakistan, the Philippines, Tanzania, and Turkey.
A House Divided Can Never Stand: Fighting White Supremacy in Global Context
"The reality is even if we took every white person on Earth and put them on a space ship and sent them to outer space white supremacy wouldn’t miss a beat."
— Junot Diaz | Facing Race (2012)
I never answered that hulking kid in front of me. By the fourth school transfer I already knew 14 year old teens cared less about my racial identity than they did figuring out what made me separate. In no time my interrogator had conjured epithets for me — “beaner,” “nacho,” “wetback,” and the most inane, “the Arabian Night-man.” 
Like most multiracial teenagers my “otherness” caused me insecurities. I bought a hair straightener so my hair would appear like the normalized styles around me, long, straight, 70s’ like. School pictures meant sucking in my lips. Dating, no thanks, I just stopped trying. Not until I was 17, away from my legal guardians, starting university, working full time and on my own did I realize never would my identity be founded in what others prescribed me as. I did not know it then, but I was starting to understand what it meant to reject white supremacy, what it meant to be a man of color, even if only partially, in a white supremacist world.
And I began to understand no matter my race I am capable of replicating through my actions and behavior the systemic oppression of white supremacy. In order for us to properly defend ourselves from oppression, we must first wholeheartedly break ourselves from it and support each other in our struggle against it no matter what face it is branded. It is through this lens that we come to understand that our liberation is bound up with the liberation of all oppressed peoples. We cannot separate.

america-wakiewakie:

"She doesn’t look American": Coca Cola & Re-Branding White Supremacy | AmericaWakieWakie

From his lips came the numbing question, “What are you?” I am human, I thought keeping quiet. He pressed onward, “No, I mean what is in you?” as if my insides varied so remarkably from his. “Are you mixed?” My lips are full. Tan skin. Dark curled hair. Brown eyes. I am half Latino. Standing in silence I peeked around him. He was bigger than me, older. The body in front of me stooped, his head titled level to mine. Curiosity left his throat as condescending bass began drumming my ears. He repeated his question, louder — “What are you?”

Growing up in Mississippi’s rural countryside these questions became coldly mechanical. Little surprise then yesterday during Coca Cola’s now controversial exercise in multiculturalism, as a Muslim woman came on screen, did I hear the inbred cousin of “What are you” — aka, “She doesn’t look American.” Both, the question asked of me and the assumption made about this woman, at their core say something else more sinister than the words actually muttered.

With bravado they say: You are not White.  

Such reminders to black and brown people in America have been a constant thread throughout our history. Yet, yesterday’s Coca Cola advert, what amounted to black and brown faces singing ‘America the Beautiful’ in native tongue, and the uproar thereafter, offers a unique lens into understanding how embedded racism truly is within our culture, even if in gross irony. In essence, literally, before us is the depth and ubiquity of America’s white supremacy.

White Supremacy is American as Apple Pie

Let’s be clear: The only reason folks — white people — are being overtly racist in the wake of Coca Cola’s commercial is because the normalized, yet often unarticulated, conception of white supremacy is almost always white. This culture of whiteness derives from itself the racial identities of its participants, its history and mythology, how they operate in the world, and perhaps most of all, it is by this process of normalization that white supremacy finds itself purposefully the dominant cultural phenomenon in America, dictating too the identities of all Others in proximity to it.

Speaking in 1965 on the ubiquity of whiteness, before a packed Cambridge debate, James Baldwin unleashed the fullness of his lived experience:

 “In the case of the American Negro, from the moment you are born every stick and stone, every face, is white. Since you have not yet seen a mirror, you suppose you are, too. It comes as a great shock around the age of 5, 6, or 7 to discover that the flag to which you have pledged allegiance, along with everybody else, has not pledged allegiance to you. It comes as a great shock to see Gary Cooper killing off the Indians, and although you are rooting for Gary Cooper, that the Indians are you.”

Not much has changed. When Coca Cola aired its commercial, black and brown Americans quickly got thousands, if not millions, of reminders that as people of color, we, like Baldwin realized, are not Gary Cooper — that, therefore, we are not constitutive elements of American culture. Visiting Twitter after the game, the visibility of white supremacy repeated itself ad nauseum:

(Photo Credit: Public Shaming @ Tumblr)

The Irony: Racists Are Offended the Ad’s Racism Wasn’t Racist Enough  

Coca Cola’s commercials, like the one aired at the Super Bowl, are propagandized rhetoric, a mouthpiece peddling systemized oppression as liberation. The racist backlash from Coca Cola’s advertisement, therefore, stems from a branding OF white supremacy which deviates from the white-only narrative. 

Building from the picture Baldwin illustrated, sheets of white opacity blanket us daily whereby, for white Americans, any skirmish away from a white dominated narrative — in this case manifested through media — is an abrupt disjoint in reality. Such an inability, or unwillingness, to deviate from the world of white supremacy speaks to a sort of normalcy that has become, in its subserviating power over individuals’ minds, totalitarian. And like all totalitarianism, a system of constant propaganda is needed to keep people in lockstep.

This is called television.

In 2006 the study Out of The Picture: Minority & Female TV Station Ownership in the United States highlighted the racial disparity, and white supremacy, of American television by analyzing the current status and the effects of FCC policy and media consolidation. Findings were as follows:

  • Minorities comprise 33 percent of the entire U.S. population, but own a total of only 44 stations, or 3.26 percent of all stations.
  • Hispanics or Latinos comprise 14 percent of the entire U.S. population, but only own a total of 15 stations, or 1.11 percent of all stations.
  • Blacks or African Americans comprise 13 percent of the entire U.S. population but only own a total of 18 stations, or 1.3 percent of all stations.
  • Asians comprise 4 percent of the entire U.S. population but only own a total of 6 stations, or 0.44 percent of all stations.

Couple these disparities with the fact that black and brown people in mainstream television often are depicted either as an afterthought, or pandering to racist stereotypes of laziness, self-destructiveness, violence, criminality, and disposability, the paradigm of white conceptions of people of color becomes grossly perverted and hostile. Thus, from within this world looking outward — even in a commercial depicting people of color as the human beings we are —  it registers least of all to the white supremacist that the legal, economic, political, educational, religious, and cultural practices of all Americans might not be those of white Americans.

Economic Imperialism Re-Branded With Black & Brown Faces

"In Guatemala, Coca Cola is a name for murder." 

— Israel Marquez, General Secretary of STEGAC (1979)

Knowing the racial disparities within our culture’s television and the institutions thereof, isn’t Coca Cola just being a good corporate citizen by challenging the white supremacist’s narrative of who ought to or could be considered American? At face value this commercial does seem as if Coca Cola is ‘leading the charge’ toward a post-racial America, but as usual if we use common sense we know corporations are rarely if ever altruistic.

Coca Cola is using the same institutions of white supremacy it has always used to increase market share locally and globally by re-branding its product with black and brown faces, a brand of multiculturalism that to the American mind – especially the white American mind — erases the longstanding history of corporate sponsored repression throughout the world.    

Guatemala has been victim to such erasure. The world’s largest beverage supplier has been bottling in the Central American nation since 1939 through franchise contracts and affiliates, one of which was Embotelladora Guatemalteca S.A., or EGSA (owned by the Flemings, a North American family from Texas). Post the United States backed coup in 1954, Guatemalan unions had been crushed. Union representation plummeted from 27% of the working population to 2%. In this backdrop the Flemings hired John C. Trotter as company President, a feverishly anti-union anti-communist. In the years from 68’ to 87’, under Trotter’s watch EGSA unionists and their families would be marred with intimidation, constant attempts to impede workers’ collaborations, beatings, rape, kidnapping, and murder.

A booklet titled Soft Drink, Hard Labour published in 1987 by the Latin America Bureau in London, England documents the 1979 casualties between April and July as “an avalanche of killings” where at least 32 EGSA associates are beaten, 4 are kidnapped and disappear, 31 are fired, 4 wounded by gunshot, a daughter of a union lawyer is raped and tortured, and 8 are murdered. In the case of Arnulfo Gomez Segura, his lips were slashed with a razor; his tongue cut from his mouth and placed in his shirt pocket. 

Per the usual corporate scapegoat, Coca Cola maintained that is had no responsibility for its affiliates’ actions. But as a campaign to boycott the Atlanta retailer wrote:

By allowing EGSA to use your trade mark, to act as your representative in Guatemala and by deriving financial benefits from your agreement with this company, you have committed your company’s image and interest. If your license holder is seen to be directly responsible for murders and other acts of violence, threats and intimidation committed against the members of the union representing the employees of EGSA, continuing cooperation between your company and this license holder constitutes complicity.”

The multinational corporation has not learned its lesson either. KillerCoke.org reported: 

“International Rights Advocates, a non-profit human rights organization, and the Conrad and Scherer law firm filed a new civil lawsuit against The Coca-Cola Company. The case was first filed in the State Supreme Court in New York on February 25, 2010, and in April it was moved to the U.S. District Court of the Southern District of New York (Case # 10-CIV-03120).

The case involves a campaign of violence that includes rape, attempted murder and murder against two Guatemalan trade unionists and their families. The two trade unionists are Jose Armando Palacios, who was forced to flee to the U.S. in early 2006, and Jose Alberto Vicente Chavez, whose son and nephew were murdered and whose daughter was gang raped on March 1, 2008.”

An old euphemism tried and true says all there is to know of corporate motive — follow the money. In an interview with NPR, Jimmy Smith, Creative Director at TBWA/CHIAT/DAY, inadvertently — but impeccably — put it:

“[A]dvertisers… definitely… understand that more than just white America is buying their products. So they’re trying to reach all cultures and all races, whether it’s Latino, black, Asian or, you know, Native American. It doesn’t matter. They just see that as another opportunity to sell their product.”

With a shallow motive as unabridged profiteering upon the backs of black and brown laborers, Coca Cola is but an extension of America’s white supremacy and purveyor of its economic imperialism. The sort of exploitation in Guatemala has been documented elsewhere too, in China, Columbia, El Salvador, India, Kenya, Mexico, Pakistan, the Philippines, Tanzania, and Turkey.

A House Divided Can Never Stand: Fighting White Supremacy in Global Context

"The reality is even if we took every white person on Earth and put them on a space ship and sent them to outer space white supremacy wouldn’t miss a beat."

— Junot Diaz | Facing Race (2012)

I never answered that hulking kid in front of me. By the fourth school transfer I already knew 14 year old teens cared less about my racial identity than they did figuring out what made me separate. In no time my interrogator had conjured epithets for me — “beaner,” “nacho,” “wetback,” and the most inane, “the Arabian Night-man.”

Like most multiracial teenagers my “otherness” caused me insecurities. I bought a hair straightener so my hair would appear like the normalized styles around me, long, straight, 70s’ like. School pictures meant sucking in my lips. Dating, no thanks, I just stopped trying. Not until I was 17, away from my legal guardians, starting university, working full time and on my own did I realize never would my identity be founded in what others prescribed me as. I did not know it then, but I was starting to understand what it meant to reject white supremacy, what it meant to be a man of color, even if only partially, in a white supremacist world.

And I began to understand no matter my race I am capable of replicating through my actions and behavior the systemic oppression of white supremacy. In order for us to properly defend ourselves from oppression, we must first wholeheartedly break ourselves from it and support each other in our struggle against it no matter what face it is branded. It is through this lens that we come to understand that our liberation is bound up with the liberation of all oppressed peoples. We cannot separate.

(via abagond)

TAGS:


PHOTO
Feb 8
10:20 pm
1,236 notes

thechanelmuse:

Anita (Ardmore, PA) | “Guyanese-American”

“‘Negro’ certainly is a passé term from way back when. We got over ‘Negro,’ we got to be ‘Black and Proud,’ and I’m still Black and proud. I always liked the term ‘Black’ because it doesn’t leave people out. I find ‘Black’ a more encompassing term than ‘African-American.’ ‘African-American’ leaves me out in a way.”

Rosa (Bronx, NY) | “Black Puerto Rican”

“You have a lot of incredible Afro-Latino activists who still don’t say that they’re Black. What they say is that they’re ‘African-descended.’ They say they’re ‘Afro-Latino.’ But a lot of people still won’t say that they’re Black. I think most of people’s issue with calling themselves Black is psychological. It’s fear. If you don’t have to be Black, why would you want to say that? In this country, everything Black is negative. I didn’t start calling myself Black until I was a sophomore in college. But once I learned about the power of the Young Lords and the Black Power Movement, I was like, ‘Why wouldn’t I want to say I was Black?’”

Kenya (Atlanta, GA)“Black”

“As an African-American, many of us trace White blood in our lineage to slavery and my family background is no different. The bottom line is my parents are Black, their parents are Black, my great grandparents are Black, and that makes me Black. I know there are people who are looking and thinking ‘She’s not Black.’ And that’s fine too. At the end of the day, I’m Black because I’m Black.”

Marianna (Baltimore, MD)“Black“

“I get ‘exotic’ a lot ‘cause people can’t really pinpoint. ‘Is she Dominican?’ ‘Is she Trini?’ ‘Is she Black and Filipino?’ ‘Is she Black and Japanese?’ It’s almost like they can’t tell so that’s alluring. All they know is it’s not ‘just Black’ and that’s all that matters. They think it’s ‘Black and something,’ but it’s that ‘something’ that they’re more focused on and that holds their attention a little bit more.”

Ariel (Brooklyn, New York)“Black”

“In Cuba, some people don’t see me as Black. Even Black people will deny my Blackness. Since I was a child, people gave me different names like ‘el chino’ because when I was younger I was really looking more like a Chinese. And then they called me names connected with my race and my ethnicity like ‘mulatto’ or ‘moro.’ They tried to emphasize that I was different because my skin is Black, but my hair is ‘White.’ So for many people in Cuba, I am mulatto or I am interracial – they don’t consider me Black. I think it goes back to the plantation days when slaves had a child with the owner, and for being less dark, that child would have a better job and a better position in society. Cuba has a long history of Whiteness in that sense – many Black people consider themselves as moving forward in society when they marry somebody White or when their kids are less dark.”

Soledad (New York, NY)“Black Latina”

“People ask me ‘What are you?’ all the time. People tweet me that question. I used to take great offense, like immediately get annoyed; partly because I didn’t think the question came from a very good place. I think I read it as questioning my value and my reasons for being wherever I was. But now, I think it’s two-fold: One, I think that because I’m a journalist, people are really just trying to understand who I am. ‘You’re somebody I see on TV, but I don’t know you in person, so who are you?’ So often, it’s not really about the question. It’s about ‘What side are you on?’ and ‘What perspective do you bring?’ Then two, I think that part of my job as a journalist is to educate people about stories and some of these stories I’m a part of. I’m part of ‘Black in America’ even in the context of who is the filter of the story.  So I’ve really gotten much better at taking that question and I’ve stopped hating it so much. It’s my job to elaborate and explain for people who I am. My mom is Afro-Cuban. My dad is White and Australian. I’m Black. I’m Latina.”

Malene(Brooklyn, NY) | “Black of Mixed Heritage”

“Trinidad is a cosmopolitan nation, probably more racially diverse than the rest of the Caribbean. We have descendants of European enslavers, freed Africans and enslaved Africans, Chinese and other Asian migrants, and a small East Indian population. You have all these mixtures and the mixtures are acknowledged. So I’m not Black in Trinidad; they consider me to be Chinese creole. They use all kinds of terms to identify people based on their racial makeup – ‘Indian,’ ‘negro,’ ‘creole,’ ‘Chinese creole,’ ‘Spanish,’ ‘coolie,’ ‘dougla.’ A ‘coolie,’ for example, is an East Indian. ‘Dougla’ is the mix of Black and East Indian. There’s really no difference between the two. It’s like saying ‘nigger’ and ‘nigga.’ To me, it’s all offensive. All of it comes from hateful places.”

Liliane (São Paulo, Brasil) | “Black”

“In Brasil, people of my color can be considered either Black or White, but it would depend on the situation, and it would also depend on the social and educational condition of the people who are seeing you. So what happens is that when someone of lower socioeconomic status sees me, they would treat me as White. But if I go to a high-class restaurant, where the people are of a higher status than me, people treat me as Black. Usually the general thought for Brasilians is that the place for Black people is in the kitchen or on the soccer field or in samba. So if you are not in one of those places, it’s like ‘Who are you and who allowed you to be here?’ And you can feel it.”

Adrian (Brooklyn, NY) | “Black Puerto-Rican”

“I think part of the misconception about Blackness is that it’s a skin color. For me personally, it’s just my way of life. Whether it’s my bloodline and family history, or the neighborhood I grew up in and the people I grew up with, or something as simple as the food that I eat, there’s so many different ways that I can identify with Blackness to where if somebody were to ask me, “Adrian, what makes you Black?” I would probably just counter the question with, “What doesn’t make me Black?” It’s not even something that I’m trying to prove. It’s just in me.”

Lauren (Philadelphia, PA) | “Black and Italian / African-American“

“The one-drop rule is not about letting society tell you who you are, but about understanding the structures around you that are already in place. It’s about understanding the complexities of Black identity and how you fit into that. At the same time, it doesn’t take away from your individuality and the beauty of your personal background or our collective history.”

(via chubbygirlindreamland)


PHOTOSET
Feb 5
1:05 am
1,433 notes

nethilia:

"Addy—while keeping the same writer through the series—has her illustrations drastically changed. The first three books were done by Melodye Rosales, who varied the skin colors and looks of the characters—for example making Addy medium skinned, Harriet high yellow, Miss Dunn light, and Sarah towards the darker scale of color. But her pictures were too much for AG and too scary; they booted her and gave the last three books to Bradford Brown—who noticeably darkened Harriet up for Addy Saves the Day and did very bland, almost non emotional scenes that didn’t hit too hard. Later, they brought in Dahl Taylor, who both standardized the looks of the books, cut the emotional impact down of many of the original scenes, and evened out the black people to a small range of browns—thus to get that nasty colorism out of the way and put that to rest. How very "radical" of you AG, to limit the skin tones of the black people shown to the colors that kept things nice and neat, and smush out the emotional impact."

AG Outsider: “Sorry, Nostalgia Kiddos, But AG Was Never ‘Radical’ “


PHOTOSET
Jan 30
10:20 pm
453 notes

"My wife and I are thinking of adopting and shockingly found in Texas, the cost for a white infant was $35,000 and the cost of a black infant was $17,000 – these are published numbers on private adoption websites."

The price of babies, by color | Chris Blattman (via abbyjean)

BUT OMG RACISM DOESN’T EXIST!

(via nessfraserloves)

That is seriously disturbing.

(via ladyatheist)

That’s not even like, a minor difference. Jesus.

(via reem-ster)

And yet people don’t wanna hear it when I say black bodies are LITERALLY devalued. 

(via ethiopienne)

surprise surprise

(via revolutionary-afrolatino)

(via dianarossweave)

TAGS:


QUOTE
Jan 26
12:01 am
15,389 notes

dianarossweave:

trickydickdollar:

yungsriracha:

i fuck black men look of the century right here

image

I thought Pink was black for like four years

i mean look at her nose

and her name is Alicia Moore

idk what else you needed

That is a black name

TAGS:


POST
Dec 19
11:47 am
1,150 notes

"Look, without our stories, without the true nature and reality of who we are as People of Color, nothing about fanboy or fangirl culture would make sense. What I mean by that is: if it wasn’t for race, X-Men doesn’t sense. If it wasn’t for the history of breeding human beings in the New World through chattel slavery, Dune doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the history of colonialism and imperialism, Star Wars doesn’t make sense. If it wasn’t for the extermination of so many Indigenous First Nations, most of what we call science fiction’s contact stories doesn’t make sense. Without us as the secret sauce, none of this works, and it is about time that we understood that we are the Force that holds the Star Wars universe together. We’re the Prime Directive that makes Star Trek possible, yeah. In the Green Lantern Corps, we are the oath. We are all of these things—erased, and yet without us—we are essential."

Junot Díaz, “The Junot Díaz Episode" (18 November 2013) on Fan Bros, a podcast “for geek culture via people of colors” (via kynodontas)

Junot Diaz stay not fucking up. This is a really good interview.

(via commanderbishoujo)

THIS RINGS SO SO SOOOOOO TRUE.

(via wocinsolidarity)

Yes, yes, yessss. All of this yes. James Baldwin touched on it some in this piece of writing.

It is not really a “Negro revolution” that is upsetting the country.  What is upsetting the country is a sense of its own identity.  If, for example, one managed to change the curriculum in all the schools so that Negroes learned more about themselves and their real contributions to this culture, you would be liberating not only Negroes, you’d be liberating white people who know nothing about their own history.  And the reason is that if you are compelled to lie about one aspect of anybody’s history, you must lie about it all.  If you have to lie about my real role here, if you have to pretend that I hoed all that cotton just because I loved you, then you have done something to yourself.  You are mad.

Long story short, there’s the notion of the white narrative wishing to make themselves heroes in the stories they tell, but in real life, they are a part of the privileged oppressive system that’s created the strife for peoples of colour  (slavery, colonialism, marginalization etc), but they can’t deal, so even with the narratives of oppression, they have to make the oppressed white (be it mutants, inhabitants of Dune, etc) because as a whole, the white narrative can’t really see the people of colour, because that would be too real.

It’s like X-men - Stan Lee modeled Charles Xavier and Magneto after Martin Luther King Jnr and Malcolm X in terms of their attitudes towards a world that hates and fears them (black people, doesn’t this sound familiar), but made them mutants, and for the first couple of volumes of the comics, you didn’t really get a key black character until Storm (she came in the early 80s, whereas X-men was around since the late sixties, off and on).

In X-men: First Class, they actually set the timeline in the 1960s, appropriated the entire Civil Rights struggle and highlights, with Lehnsherr and Xavier at the Washington monument where Martin Luther King Jr gave his “I have a dream” speech, and yet in the movie, they killed the black guy, and the black female turned traitor. They took all the trappings of the unrest of the 1960s (it wasn’t just Cuba and the Bay of Pigs), and whitewashed it. As a comic book nerd, my heart hurt over that one.

Yes Diaz, yes. Yessss. All of this.

(via jazzypom)

Yep.

We are the X-Men, the aliens, the context for all your geeky shit.

(via ladymargo)

(via ladymargo)

TAGS:


QUOTE
Dec 4
7:27 pm
14,091 notes

Peace Love & Afro Puffs...

Here you will find: thoughtful words. beautiful heads of kinky curly hair. things from the various corners of the geekdom universe. vintage images and clothing. cinema talk. and commentary on a variety of topics ... basically the all around randomness that is me. :)